Friday, November 3rd

Announcement 1: Please send me an email with you first three choices for the Lit Journal Exploration Project! Almost half of you haven’t done this. Get on it.

Announcement 2: Group One’s poems (up to two, no more than two pages long each) are due on Monday, November 6th by 5 PM. Those in Group One should upload their poems to the discussion board by that time. Group One includes:

  • Angie Bolan
  • Jacob Bott
  • Peter Diller
  • Ian Sunberg

Announcement 3: 

Today we talked about the logistics of workshop and decided to hold our fifth workshop on Monday, November 27th (rather than Wednesday, November 22nd as previously scheduled) since people will likely be out of town. We will still be holding class on Wednesday, November 22nd! We’ll talk a little bit about literary publishing that day. But our last poetry workshop will be moved, and your Lit Journal Exploration Project will now be due on Wednesday, November 29th.

Friday, November 3rd 

  • Detail Question: What’s a particular object you remember from a family member’s dresser?
  • Poem of the Day: “The Bat” by Theodore Roethke
  • We talked about logistics for workshop, so check out the announcement listed above
  • We read some poems in syllabics  (poems that have the same number of syllables per line, but not a specific metrical structure) and how they can be used as a way to structure poems without fully invoking meter

Homework for Friday November 6th

  • Choose: A literary journal to explore by going to the Poetry Resources pages on this blog, looking over the journals, and then Emailing Miss Cole (coleer@mail.uc.edu) with your top three choices. I’ll give the journals to the first person that emails me and do my best to accommodate everyone’s first choice.
  • Read: My Persona Poem Notes to give you a basic idea of how persona poetry works
  • Read: The accompanying persona poem packet to see some examples of each kind of persona listed in the notes
  • Write:  Keep working on your poem drafts! Here’s another prompt for you to try:

Write a poem in syllabic meter! Choose a certain number of syllables and stick to that number in each line.

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