Wednesday, November 22nd

Announcement: I was going to announce this on Monday, and completely forgot, but please bring your writing journals on Monday so I can look them over and return them to you on Wednesday

Wednesday November 22nd

Homework for Monday, November 27th

  • Read: Your peers’ workshop poems for our last workshop on the Monday after Thanksgiving
  • Write: Make sure that you thoroughly read the poems in Group Five and write both margin comments (both what you thought was working and what you thought wasn’t) and about 6 – 10 sentences of summative commentary at the end of the story. Refer to the question in your workshop handout frequently!
  • Write: Remember to do work on your literary journal project over break!
  • Remember to bring your writing journals on Monday so I can collect them
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Monday, November 20th

Monday November 20th

  • We had a successful and productive poetry workshop. Well done, everyone! Remember, we have class on Wednesday

Homework for Wednesday, November 22th

  • Read: Your peers’ workshop poems for our last workshop on the Monday after Thanksgiving
  • Write: Make sure that you thoroughly read the poems in Group Five and write both margin comments (both what you thought was working and what you thought wasn’t) and about 6 – 10 sentences of summative commentary at the end of the story. Refer to the question in your workshop handout frequently!
  • Write: Remember to do work on your literary journal project over break!

Wednesday, November 17th

Wednesday November 17th

  • We had a successful and productive first poetry workshop. Well done, everyone! I look forward to workshop on Friday!

Homework for Monday, November 20th

  • Read: Your peers’ workshop poems
  • Write: Make sure that you thoroughly read the poems in Group Four and write both margin comments (both what you thought was working and what you thought wasn’t) and about 6 – 10 sentences of summative commentary at the end of the story. Refer to the question in your workshop handout frequently!

Monday, November 13th

Announcement: Group Four’s poems (up to two, no more than two pages long each) are due today by 5 PM. Those in Group Four should upload their poems to the discussion board by that time. Group Four includes:

  • Shannon Burwinkel
  • Jaida Whitely
  • Abby Palen
  • Maggie Schwettman

Monday, November 13th

  • We had a successful and productive first poetry workshop. Well done, everyone! I look forward to workshop on Wednesday.

Homework for Wednesday, November 15th

  • Read: Your peers’ workshop poems
  • Write: Make sure that you thoroughly read the poems in Group Two and write both margin comments (both what you thought was working and what you thought wasn’t) and about 6 – 10 sentences of summative commentary at the end of the story. Refer to the question in your workshop handout frequently!

Friday, November 10th

Announcement 1: There are still a few people who haven’t sent me their first three choices for the Lit Journal Exploration Project! If you’re one of these people, please send me your choices by the end of the weekend.

Announcement 2: Group Three’s poems (up to two, no more than two pages long each) are due today by 5 PM. Those in Group Three should upload their poems to the discussion board by that time. Group Three includes:

  • Katie Bartmess
  • Brian Conner
  • Dernae Malone
  • Haley Windsor

Friday, November 10th

  • No class today due to Veteran’s Day!

Homework for Monday, November 13th

  • Read: You peers’ workshop poems!
  • Write: Workshop starts on Monday! Make sure that you thoroughly read the poems in group one and write both margin comments (both what you thought was working and what you thought wasn’t) and about 6 – 10 sentences of summative commentary at the end of the story. Refer to the question in your workshop handout frequently!

 

Wednesday, November 8th

Announcement 1: Please send me an email with you first three choices for the Lit Journal Exploration Project! Almost half of you haven’t done this. Get on it.

Announcement 2: Group Two’s poems (up to two, no more than two pages long each) are due today by 5 PM. Those in Group Two should upload their poems to the discussion board by that time. Group Two includes:

  • Rebecca Cole
  • Amina Adesiji
  • McKenna Belmont
  • Sydney Fredrick

Wednesday November 8th

  • Detail Question: What’s a toy you always wanted but never had?
  • Poem of the Day: “Buoy” by Carsie Blanton, which is composed almost entirely of similes. We listened to the song and talked about how both sides of the simile are important — both the descriptor and what’s being described
  • We talked about similes are vehicles for imagination, and how they are often used to explain desires or emotions that are otherwise difficult to grasp with words
  • We looked at an example of an extended simile through Jack Gilbert’s “Machiko Dead” and talked about how similes can extend through the whole poem to encompass one single concept
  • We talked about how similes can be used as a tool of the imagination, but need some grounding in narrative or structure. This balance of fixed and unfixed elements is very much at play in Jack Gilbert’s “Finding Something” which starts in an imaginative mode (“I say moon is horses in the tempered dark”), turns to concrete description (“I sit on the terrace of this worn villa”), and then turns back toward imagination at the end (“The arches of her feet are like voices /
    of children calling in the grove of lemon trees, / where my heart is as helpless as crushed birds).

Homework for Monday, November 13th

  • Read: You peers’ workshop poems!
  • Write: Workshop starts on Monday! Make sure that you thoroughly read the poems in group one and write both margin comments (both what you thought was working and what you thought wasn’t) and about 6 – 10 sentences of summative commentary at the end of the story. Refer to the question in your workshop handout frequently!

Monday, November 6th

Announcement 1: Please send me an email with you first three choices for the Lit Journal Exploration Project! Almost half of you haven’t done this. Get on it.

Announcement 2: Group One’s poems (up to two, no more than two pages long each) are due today by 5 PM. Those in Group One should upload their poems to the discussion board by that time. Group One includes:

  • Angie Bolan
  • Jacob Bott
  • Peter Diller
  • Ian Sunberg

 

Monday November 6th

  • Detail Question: Who’s your favorite superhero (or everyday hero)?
  • Poem of the Day: “Hulk Smash” by Greg Santos
  • We read the poem of the day and talked about how it delivers on the voice it sets up for Hulk, but also how it undermines what we know (or think we know) about Hulk
  • We used this as a jumping off point to talk about how persona poems are used to surprise us based on the kinds of stories that they tell and the perspectives that they use: when writing a persona poem, you want to be thinking about the angle you’re addressing the story from. Are you working with an expected perspective, like a minor character or an overlooked object? Are you providing deeper context for a villain’s motivation? Are you providing historical context to a story that’s often told without that context?
  • To practice this idea, we brainstormed some unexpected perspectives for persona poems, including Moby Dick (Ahab’s white whale), Gatsby’s pocket watch, the various forest creatures who dress Disney Princesses, and several others

Homework for Wednesday November 8th

  • Find: Similes are everywhere! In songs, in commercials, and, of course, in poetry. Your mission is to find and recover five similes that already exist in the world and bring them to class with you on Friday. Remember that we’re talking about similes here, so the comparisons should use “like” or “as.” You’re free to look at poems to find these similes, but don’t overlook the popular fabric of everyday life (for example, but you could also use a simile like one from Taylor Swift’s “Red”: “Loving him was like driving a new Maserati down a dead-end street.” Find five of those and bring them to class with you. (Don’t be greedy, though. Try to choose one good simile per song/source.)
  • Write: Additionally, I’d like you to write an additional three similes of your very own. Be as detailed as possible.
  • Write:  Keep working on your poem drafts! Here’s another prompt for you to try:

Using one of the ideas we came up with in class today (or a new idea of your own!) explore a new perspective by trying to write a persona poem. Think about how your speaker would talk — pay attention to how you can make their story surprising.

Friday, November 3rd

Announcement 1: Please send me an email with you first three choices for the Lit Journal Exploration Project! Almost half of you haven’t done this. Get on it.

Announcement 2: Group One’s poems (up to two, no more than two pages long each) are due on Monday, November 6th by 5 PM. Those in Group One should upload their poems to the discussion board by that time. Group One includes:

  • Angie Bolan
  • Jacob Bott
  • Peter Diller
  • Ian Sunberg

Announcement 3: 

Today we talked about the logistics of workshop and decided to hold our fifth workshop on Monday, November 27th (rather than Wednesday, November 22nd as previously scheduled) since people will likely be out of town. We will still be holding class on Wednesday, November 22nd! We’ll talk a little bit about literary publishing that day. But our last poetry workshop will be moved, and your Lit Journal Exploration Project will now be due on Wednesday, November 29th.

Friday, November 3rd 

  • Detail Question: What’s a particular object you remember from a family member’s dresser?
  • Poem of the Day: “The Bat” by Theodore Roethke
  • We talked about logistics for workshop, so check out the announcement listed above
  • We read some poems in syllabics  (poems that have the same number of syllables per line, but not a specific metrical structure) and how they can be used as a way to structure poems without fully invoking meter

Homework for Friday November 6th

  • Choose: A literary journal to explore by going to the Poetry Resources pages on this blog, looking over the journals, and then Emailing Miss Cole (coleer@mail.uc.edu) with your top three choices. I’ll give the journals to the first person that emails me and do my best to accommodate everyone’s first choice.
  • Read: My Persona Poem Notes to give you a basic idea of how persona poetry works
  • Read: The accompanying persona poem packet to see some examples of each kind of persona listed in the notes
  • Write:  Keep working on your poem drafts! Here’s another prompt for you to try:

Write a poem in syllabic meter! Choose a certain number of syllables and stick to that number in each line.

Wednesday, November 1st

Reminder! Please send me an email with you first three choices for the Lit Journal Exploration Project!

Wednesday, November 1st 

  • Detail Question: What’s the most memorable costume you’ve ever seen (or worn?)
  • We read the poem of the day, Dorethea Tanning’s “All Hallows Eve” and discussed how it fit into the basic consideration of a sonnet, which are, at its heart, how sonnets have fourteen lines and a turn, or volta.
  • We discussed how this structure allows sonnets to act as an argument, sometimes describing a situation or idea (as in “The Lull” or “Country Song”) and then turning back to consider it or look at it in a different light. The difference between a sonnet and a 14 line poem is that the sonnet will at some point reflect back on itself in some way
  • Other markers of sonnets that we discussed included: the presence of meter (traditionally iambic pentameter) and a rhyme scheme (usually abab cbcb efef gg for a Shakespearean sonnet). These techniques are not required for a modern sonnet, however.

Homework for Friday November 3

  • Choose: A literary journal to explore by going to the Poetry Resources pages on this blog, looking over the journals, and then Emailing Miss Cole (coleer@mail.uc.edu) with your top three choices. I’ll give the journals to the first person that emails me and do my best to accommodate everyone’s first choice.
  • Read: Some poems in syllabics: “Cash Register Sings the Blues” by Maria Nazos, “Corpse Bird” by Ron Rash, “The Air Smelled Dirty” by Marge Piercy
  • Write:  Keep working on your poem drafts! Here’s another prompt for you to try:

 

Based on what you learn today’s reading, write a sonnet. It doesn’t have to be a perfect sonnet, and it doesn’t necessarily have to employ meter, or even rhyme (although if you want to challenge yourself, I invite you to do both of these things). What it should have is 14 lines (sonnets are always 14 lines, after all) and also a volta, or turn, where the speaker comes to conclusion or begins to reexamine the issue discussed in the first part of the sonnet.